How a pharmaceutical market leader used NetDimensions to eliminate compliance risk

Keeping workforces compliant with legislation is a major challenge in the pharmaceutical industry – and failing to do so can be extremely risky. With a seamless integration of NetDimensions technology, one market leader’s L&D team ensured they could face compliance risk and meet the demands of regulators such as FDA and EMA.

The ability to manage compliance risk is expected to become more crucial than ever in the pharmaceutical and life sciences sector by 2020 [1].

Businesses need to protect themselves from the heavy costs of non-compliance. A culture of quality is crucial to reducing and eliminating exposure to risks including financial penalties, rescinded regulatory approvals and reputational damage.

Demystifying the process of complying with 21 CFR Part 11

There’s been a lack of clarity around what’s needed to comply with 21 CFR Part 11, the US Food and Drug Administration’s regulations for inspecting electronic training records held by organizations.

Implementing electronic signatures and being able to clearly audit their use has often been a considerable challenge for businesses in the life sciences and pharma sectors.

This is an essential requirement for companies in these sectors looking to comply with the FDA’S CFR regulations. In-depth and rigorous auditing is increasingly sought-after by organizations in other sectors too, such as healthcare.

A photo of a person sitting at a laptop holding a bottle of manufactured pharma drugs as an illustration of the pharma 21 CFR Part 11 regulation

How mobile devices can transform your learning

Knowledge-building on the go and improved retention are a couple of the big benefits mobile devices can bring to your learning. In this blog, we’ll touch upon some of the sectors in which mobile learning is revolutionizing training, and highlight a few of the great advantages it gives you and your team.

At their worst, mobile devices distract us from work and take the blame for shortening attention spans [1]. At their best, they dramatically enhance the way we work and make almost all aspects of training easier.

Used wisely, mobile devices are a powerful tools, whether you want to improve collaboration in the creation of eLearning courses or give learners just-in-time compliance information on the other side of the world.

A female commuter using a mobile device to access learning during her commute

Building Global Virtual Teams and Virtual Learning Capability

A new model of global organization is coming to the fore. Traditional top-down hierarchies have been swept away in favor of agile and responsive ‘networks of teams’. These are virtual teams that are set up and disbanded as needed to create new products and services and meet fresh global challenges from new competitors.

The challenge organizations face is how best to build the skills base of individuals to optimize global virtual team working.

Deloitte has described this trend as ‘the rise of teams’. Many companies have already begun the move away from conventional functional structures – 92% of companies surveyed by Deloitte believe that redesigning the organization is ‘very important’ or ‘important’. Deloitte discovered that only 38% of all companies and 24% of large companies with more than 50,000 employees are organized function by function.

However, key to the success of contemporary, agile ways of working is ensuring that individual employees have the necessary skills for flexible working across borders.

Building a Successful Workplace for the 2020s

This guest blog post by Jeremy Blain was originally published on LinkedIn Pulse as part of a week-long series of blog posts featuring the five drivers for success as we head to the 2020s workplace, according the white paper “5 Key Drivers to Build a Successful Workplace for the 2020s” published by Cegos Asia Pacific.

 
Driver #2 of 5: Impact of Technology
Welcome to the fourth industrial revolution — digitization of work, communication, collaboration, learning, life…
 

Considering an increasingly remote and potentially independent workforce of the near future, 83% of respondents believe that as Gen Z enter the workforce they will require and will demand far greater peer connectivity using mobile devices.

 
Technology remains at the heart of modern business, and is playing an increasingly important role in how we connect with clients and associates alike.

Respondents told us they are already preparing for the changes that come with new technology; many believing that our working practices will become more automated over time.
 

Technology Now

We asked a group of business, learning and HR leaders how their organizations were using / benefiting from new technologies, enabling greater efficiency of and effectiveness within their workforce.

Their top 5 outputs were: