Learning “On the Move” – Key Strategies for a Mobile Learning Program

The mobile devices in our pockets have officially taken over. As of October 2014, there are now more mobile devices than people. Mobile devices have now become the primary internet device for many web users. In fact, the 2015 Internet Trends Report found U.S. web users turn to their mobile device for almost 3 hours of internet time each day.

As usage becomes ubiquitous, we expect these devices to never be out of reach. They have also become an effective learning tool. Hence, the rise of learning now being pushed to the mobile experience.

Just like we learned that taking a classroom experience and putting it online does not make an effective web based training or online learning experience – neither will simply scaling down existing content so it fits on a smaller screen.

Learning Solutions Magazine said it best:

“Being able to view eLearning content on a smartphone doesn’t make it mLearning in just the same way that throwing slides meant for use in instructor-led training onto a web page doesn’t make them eLearning. Redesign is always the best option.”

An effective, strategic mobile learning or performance support program requires new thinking and new approaches. Here are three strategies we have learned building mobile programs for NetDimensions’ clients.


How do NGOs deploy learning and learning technologies?

lingos_smallChris Proulx, the CEO of LINGOs, the international non-government organization (NGO) sector’s largest membership-based consortium dedicated solely to training and capacity building, just wrote an interesting blog piece on how NGOs deploy learning.

You can read Chris’s piece here.

Worth a look, even if you’re not in the NGO world.


A Strong Start to the Year

Our team started 2015 in full speed all over the world.

In London, we were a sponsor at Learning Technologies 2015. George Walker, our director of Global Services, gave a “Back to the Future”-inspired presentation: “From small data to big data – the benefits of learning and talent analytics.”

Liam Butler, our EMEA GM, participated in a Google Hangout session with Matt Wicks, CTO of Dreamtek. The session focused on the future of Learning Management Systems, and it was moderated by Don Taylor, Chairman of the Learning Technologies Conference. You can catch the recording of the session here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FC2mxRD3VRc

In Karlsruhe, we exhibited at Learntec 2015 with our messaging around high-consequence industries resonating very well with the audience. Dirk Flaskamp, one of our Sales Directors in Germany, gave a presentation at the “Anwenderforum”(User forum) on “Talent Management for Everyone.” Our focus was on why organizations should really focus their Learning & Development programs to the middle employees instead of just their top talent. We were also delighted to meet up with a few of our German clients, like tesa, SEW-EURODRIVE & Fresenius Medical Care.


Analytics — The First Pass

Vendor AnalyticsLast year a group of executives at one of our big company clients decided to take a hard look at efficiency and outcome issues around learning.

Having to deal with a variety of use cases, end-user groups and training providers, not to mention the complications of operating in more than 50 countries and 18 languages, the executives saw their immediate task as getting on top of the data.

To this end, they put the following into effect:

  1. All courses, seminars and training events now end with a mandatory, standardized evaluation comprised of five questions, the first being the by-now-classic Net Promoter Score (“NPS” or the number of raving fans minus the number of complainers divided by the total number of responses multiplied by 100, this process yielding a number somewhere between minus and plus 100 – big positive numbers are good). The NPS question is followed by simple, sensible questions on each training program’s relevance by job role and topic, quality and effect.
  2. Individual employee progress is now measured the same way and on the same scale for all training.
  3. Costs are standardized on a per-employee basis and resolved to a base currency.