Building a Successful Workplace for the 2020s

This guest blog post by Jeremy Blain was originally published on LinkedIn Pulse as part of a week-long series of blog posts featuring the five drivers for success as we head to the 2020s workplace, according the white paper “5 Key Drivers to Build a Successful Workplace for the 2020s” published by Cegos Asia Pacific.

 
Driver #2 of 5: Impact of Technology
Welcome to the fourth industrial revolution — digitization of work, communication, collaboration, learning, life…
 

Considering an increasingly remote and potentially independent workforce of the near future, 83% of respondents believe that as Gen Z enter the workforce they will require and will demand far greater peer connectivity using mobile devices.

 
Technology remains at the heart of modern business, and is playing an increasingly important role in how we connect with clients and associates alike.

Respondents told us they are already preparing for the changes that come with new technology; many believing that our working practices will become more automated over time.
 

Technology Now

We asked a group of business, learning and HR leaders how their organizations were using / benefiting from new technologies, enabling greater efficiency of and effectiveness within their workforce.

Their top 5 outputs were:

Why is mobile not buzzing yet? (Part 2 of 2)

This is the conclusion of a 2-part guest blog post from Speexx, sponsor of NextSteps 2016, NetDimensions’ Global User Conference. Click here to read Part 1.

 

Step 2: Engage, engage!

For the learner, offering training that is optimized for a mobile device can be very engaging, as it allows him or her to drive their learning path, when and where is most convenient. This flexibility impacts the success rate of your learners and therefore the success and cost effectiveness of the training program.

Remember, you want to engage with learners with both content and tools that they are used to seeing outside of the workplace, from gamification elements of learning to mobile devices.

mobile-learning-solution-03

Why is mobile not buzzing yet? (Part 1 of 2)

This is the first of a 2-part guest blog post from Speexx, sponsor of NextSteps 2016, NetDimensions’ Global User Conference.

Going through recommended readings posted by HR thought leader Laura Overton, I noticed that thought Leaders in HR often speak about the top trends in learning and development. And their bucket list for 2016 includes cloud based learning platforms, micro-learning and ´going mobile´.

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But how much are we using mobile learning in our communication training programs? Are we really implementing it?

Developing a High-Octane Approach to Learning

The new learning audience is dynamic, mobile and highly sophisticated.
L&D teams must push the envelope
to create new blended learning strategies.

 

Organizations today are quickly understanding that their learning strategies need to be restructured. With changes in how work is performed (telecommuting, globalization, decentralized workforces) and in the learning audience itself (Baby Boomers to Gen Me), organizations face the most complex learning environment ever presented.

The fundamental driver for this quickly increasing level of complexity is that learning in all forms must take a blended approach to attract the learner to want to learn and maximize depth and length of retention. Learning that isn’t appealing to the learner (i.e., fun, interesting and highly relevant to their professional and personal development) will go nowhere.

There are two components to making learning appealing:

  • Learning Content Development, which must employ imagery and mixed media with eye-popping graphics that draw the learner into the subject.
  • Delivery, which must be multi-modal to keep the learner’s attention and make the learning easy to apply. Most importantly, the delivery must be done in a way that provides performance support at the time of need of the learner. The days of the one size fits all course have come to a close.

These principles apply to all forms of learning, including mandatory and compliance training. Just because learning is required doesn’t mean that learners will remember it or apply it – and they will go kicking and screaming into having to participate. The most heavily regulated organization must apply a blended learning strategy that compels people to want to learn and offers an engaging way to do so.

We also must realize that learning is happening all around us in the workplace. In today’s need for learning and training that is relevant and available at the speed of business, employees seek out what they need to know, from whomever has it.

Organizations must understand that the new learning audience is dynamic, mobile and highly sophisticated. Learning and Development teams must push the envelope to create new blended learning strategies that embody an instructional, collaborative and formative approach that attracts and motivates the learner. But do we understand how to develop a high-octane blended learning approach? How do we make sure that this approach is aligned with the needs and compliance requirements of the business?

We must develop learning strategies that include:

  • Multiple modalities that promote and encourage a mix of company and learner-generated content
  • Socialization and discussion around the learning
  • Coaching and mentoring to help reinforce the learning
  • Real-world practical application that encourages learners to embrace a new way of thinking and acting.

Without this approach, learning will just be a “check the box” exercise with no discernable impact on individual or organizational performance.

 

Contributor

Michael_Rochelle_Headshot-073Michael Rochelle
Chief Strategy Officer and Principal HCM Analyst, Brandon Hall Group
Twitter: @MichaelRochelle

Michael oversees consulting, strategic services, and advisory support for Brandon Hall Group members. Michael is also one of the company’s principal analysts covering topics such as learning, talent, sales and marketing, and executive management.

Michael will be the keynote speaker at NextSteps 2016, NetDimensions’ Global User Conference, on April 13th – 15th. Learn more at the NextSteps website.

Learning Portals – Transforming the learner’s experience

The term “learning portal” is used liberally in the training industry, but what does it really mean?

By common definition, a portal is described as a gateway, doorway or entrance. Likewise, in computing it generally refers to a website that provides links or gateways to other websites. This idea affords businesses with the opportunity to consolidate relevant learning resources and tools into one location to accomplish a specific business or learning goal.

So, how is a portal different from a Learning Management System (LMS)? It’s a fair question with a fuzzy answer.

LMS’ such as NetDimensions Talent Suite are highly configurable and are capable of providing a portal-like experience using out-of-the-box functionality. However, organizations commonly configure their LMS as a one-size-fits-all solution to provide a superset of content and tools for many people within the organization, and covering many different subject areas.

A custom portal, on the other hand, provides a learning experience that targets a specific business goal, audience or subject area to deliver a focused, holistic learning solution. Today, we see that businesses are developing portals for multiple subject areas, including:

  • New hire onboarding
  • Sales training
  • Service training
  • Manufacturing training
  • Compliance or technical training
  • Extended enterprise and more

 

So what’s the big deal?