SaaS – A “Disruptive Technology” and more (part 2 of 2)

In part 1 of this post we analyzed SaaS as a “disruptive innovation” and what that may entail in terms of value to clients and SaaS providers.

Although SaaS is a well-understood model today, there are differences on how SaaS providers define SaaS (or their preferred flavor of SaaS). A number of leading SaaS vendors have claimed multi-tenancy as a necessary component of any SaaS offering. There is a fair amount of controversy here, but is multi-tenancy what defines SaaS?

As a quick backgrounder, multi-tenancy refers to a software architecture where a single instance of the software runs on a server, serving multiple tenants, where tenants are separate companies, or in a broader sense, any application – either inside or outside the enterprise – that needs its own secure and exclusive virtual computing environment. So how does multi-tenancy come to play?

Technology and the future of our business

I just read an article on Forbes magazine online about IBM CEO Ginni Rometty predicting three ways that technology will change the way we do business. The Forbes article was based on Ms Rometty’s speech at the Corporate Conference of the nonprofit Council on Foreign Relations. There is a video recording of this session here.

I couldn’t agree more with all the three ways that Ms Rometty analyses, and I believe all three of these ways profoundly affect the business we are in: human capital management.  Here’s how:

  1. Analytics – data analytics are coming to HR and the ability to harness talent-related data affects every talent-related function from hiring, to training, to engagement, to career development, to succession planning, to retention, to compensation, to dismissal.  Moreover, talent analytics provides the link between talent management processes, business metrics, and value creation.
  2. Social – it may sound like a cliché, but the new fabric of the enterprise is social and it is strategic.  Social technologies are enabling employee collaboration, knowledge and expertise sharing, people search and team formation, informal learning, continuous coaching and mentoring, and peer recognition models in a way that transcends formal organizational structures and redefines strict HR transactional processes.
  3. Personalization – we see personalization into the talent management as targeted recruitment, personalized learning and development plans, on-demand performance support, workplace technology consumerization, and individualized career paths. This is the point when talent management is transformed from an HR-driven process to a business-driven one.

These three ways are not predictions into the future, but instead they are changing our business today. Thoughts?