How a pharmaceutical market leader used NetDimensions to eliminate compliance risk

Keeping workforces compliant with legislation is a major challenge in the pharmaceutical industry – and failing to do so can be extremely risky. With a seamless integration of NetDimensions technology, one market leader’s L&D team ensured they could face compliance risk and meet the demands of regulators such as FDA and EMA.

The ability to manage compliance risk is expected to become more crucial than ever in the pharmaceutical and life sciences sector by 2020 [1].

Businesses need to protect themselves from the heavy costs of non-compliance. A culture of quality is crucial to reducing and eliminating exposure to risks including financial penalties, rescinded regulatory approvals and reputational damage.

Demystifying the process of complying with 21 CFR Part 11

There’s been a lack of clarity around what’s needed to comply with 21 CFR Part 11, the US Food and Drug Administration’s regulations for inspecting electronic training records held by organizations.

Implementing electronic signatures and being able to clearly audit their use has often been a considerable challenge for businesses in the life sciences and pharma sectors.

This is an essential requirement for companies in these sectors looking to comply with the FDA’S CFR regulations. In-depth and rigorous auditing is increasingly sought-after by organizations in other sectors too, such as healthcare.

A photo of a person sitting at a laptop holding a bottle of manufactured pharma drugs as an illustration of the pharma 21 CFR Part 11 regulation

What is an integrated learning ecosystem?

Learning ecosystems are a big buzzword in L&D at the moment, but not everyone agrees on what they are and why they’re important. In this blog, we delve into what an integrated learning ecosystem is and why an LMS is a vital part of a thriving ecosystem.

In biology, an ecosystem refers to a community of organisms that interact with one another in a shared environment. In the world of technology and learning, an ecosystem is not so different.

According to Harvard Business School, an IT ecosystem is “the network of organizations that drives the creation and delivery of information technology products and services.” These days, establishing an ecosystem out of your IT infrastructure involves making every component work as a well-oiled machine.

Each individual element of your architecture – the hardware, the software, and the services – should work together, and speak to each other, even if every piece of equipment and software comes from a different vendor.

Finding the value of learning for your business today

What is the value of learning?

For workplace Learning and Development (L&D) professionals the answer may take many forms. It may be an individual’s positive reaction to learning something new. It may be the ability of individuals – or their employers – to tackle a new task.

In more formal measurement, it may be seen in the calculation of a learning programme’s Return on Investment (ROI). Whatever approach the department takes, however, any assessment of the impact of learning is effectively meaningless without answering one question.

A photo of a group of people looking at the value of learning with NetDimensions

How does the business see the value of learning?

Demystifying Big Data and Analytics

For the past few years, buzzwords about (big or small) data and making sense of all that information have been thrown around quite often by industry research analysts and vendors alike.

 

First things first — what is big data? Where does it come from?

According to the Gartner IT Glossary big data includes high-volume, high-velocity and/or high-variety information assets that demand cost-effective, innovative forms of information processing that enable enhanced insight, decision making, and process automation.

The fourth V, veracity can be considered the most important. How accurate is that data in predicting business value? Do the results of a big data analysis actually make sense? Data must be able to be verified based on both accuracy and context.1

analytics-imageMore specifically in the context of HR professionals, department managers, chief learning officers, and training managers, the vast pool of information consists of personnel data, learning or training data, job profiles, competencies, performance appraisals, and more. Your organization already has some or all of these pieces of data, and even a lot more. One of the challenges is that these pieces of information are most likely stored or recorded in silos. 

Keep in mind there is already plenty of enough useful information to analyze within your Learning Management System (LMS) alone to get started.