How a pharmaceutical market leader used NetDimensions to eliminate compliance risk

Keeping workforces compliant with legislation is a major challenge in the pharmaceutical industry – and failing to do so can be extremely risky. With a seamless integration of NetDimensions technology, one market leader’s L&D team ensured they could face compliance risk and meet the demands of regulators such as FDA and EMA.

The ability to manage compliance risk is expected to become more crucial than ever in the pharmaceutical and life sciences sector by 2020 [1].

Businesses need to protect themselves from the heavy costs of non-compliance. A culture of quality is crucial to reducing and eliminating exposure to risks including financial penalties, rescinded regulatory approvals and reputational damage.

Demystifying the process of complying with 21 CFR Part 11

There’s been a lack of clarity around what’s needed to comply with 21 CFR Part 11, the US Food and Drug Administration’s regulations for inspecting electronic training records held by organizations.

Implementing electronic signatures and being able to clearly audit their use has often been a considerable challenge for businesses in the life sciences and pharma sectors.

This is an essential requirement for companies in these sectors looking to comply with the FDA’S CFR regulations. In-depth and rigorous auditing is increasingly sought-after by organizations in other sectors too, such as healthcare.

A photo of a person sitting at a laptop holding a bottle of manufactured pharma drugs as an illustration of the pharma 21 CFR Part 11 regulation

6 benefits of a modern learning management system

Are you thinking about investing in a Learning Management System? Find out more about the benefits of an LMS in this blog.

If you don’t have a modern LMS at the moment, how are you currently sharing your eLearning?

Are you:

  • Using an Intranet or enterprise social network?
  • Hosting your courses on a cloud-based web server?
  • Still using a legacy LMS but in the most minimal way possible, as the set-up doesn’t match your current requirements?
  • Using a mix of all of the above, with your courses scattered in various places?

These solutions are OK if your key objective is simply delivering courses to your learners.

Considering the benefits of modern learning management systems

Three steps toward future-proofing your learning program

How to invest in your LMS now and be ready for the future

Adaptive learning. Gamification software. Microlearning. Thanks to these exciting new tools and advanced technologies – along with the evolution of business needs and market trends – the global electronic learning market is booming. Predictions are that it will continue to do so, with growth reaching $255 billion this year.[1]

If you are charged with managing the learning management system, or LMS, in your organization, you’ll be on the lookout for opportunities to incorporate these new tools and technologies. But be careful; it’s important to give a great deal of consideration to future-proofing your technology.

LMS: Evolution or Extinction: 8 Trends That Change Everything (Part 2 of 8): Extended Enterprise LMS

Trend #2: Extended Enterprise LMS

While most companies (71%) still use their learning management system (LMS) mainly for employee training (see chart below), the globalization and increased competition have led to the rise in the number of partner relationships, distributor and reseller networks, franchises, and contractors, and consequently the need for a centralized learning solution for the whole extended enterprise.

LMS-user-community-chart-BHG

Centralized training and certification management allows companies to keep product and service quality consistent across the whole value chain.

At the same time the increasingly strict and continually changing regulatory environment has created a need for compliance management across the whole value chain, especially in highly regulated industries.

The delivery of training, licensing, and certification programs to external channels increases partner, customer, and end-user engagement, satisfaction and product usage. It is the most cost-efficient way to bring external stakeholders to the same level of competency and product knowledge as the internal employees.

By creating customized and branded learning portals, companies can provide engaging learning experiences for different audiences across the extended enterprise. Mobile solutions also allow the contractors, such as sales agents, to take training in a flexible way, at the point of need, even when not connected to the Internet.

High-quality training, certification management, and the ability to measure KPIs across the whole value chain can have a direct impact on an organization’s business performance. Learning in the extended enterprise should also be an interactive process. For example, the dealership network is able to give valuable insights from buyers and market when the LMS supports such collaboration.

To measure performance against defined KPIs using advanced analytics tools, reports can be segmented by learner group, whether they consist of internal employees, partners, suppliers, or dealers.

When thinking about using an LMS for the extended enterprise, security management needs to be taken into account. A compliance-focused LMS can support central management of security with features such as access and password control, version control, workflow management, e-signatures, as well as audit trails of all activities.

What to consider for your LMS in terms of the extended enterprise:

  • Portals, branding, and personalization
  • E-commerce capabilities
  • Security
  • A new role of the LMS
    • Revenue generation
    • Quality management
    • Documentation distribution
    • Partner certifications
    • Analytics

Given these considerations, can you leverage the same LMS investment for both internal & external audiences?

This is the second of an eight-part series on LMS: Evolution or Extinction — 8 Trends that Change Everything.