6 hassle-free ways to switch to a new LMS

If your organization has used the same Learning Management System (LMS) for a long time, switching to a new system can seem like a daunting prospect, particularly if your workforce is comfortable with your existing LMS. In a new NetDimensions Insight, we’ll show you how to make the change smoothly.

Learning leaders are often held back from enjoying all the benefits of a modern, optimized learning management system, instead finding themselves working with an old LMS which lacks the capability to enable the kind of eLearning which can accelerate organizational success.

LMS best practice: enhanced user experience and analytics capabilities

This post is the second in a 2-part blog series that looks at some of the ways that L&D managers can improve the learning technology in their organizations, with a specific focus on user experience and analytics. To read part 1, click here.
 

Learning Management Systems create poor user experience

According to a study conducted by the Brandon Hall Group, 50.6% of organizations say poor user experience is a significant barrier to satisfaction with learning technology. It’s important for a company to have an easy-to-use, modern-looking system.

Employees today are both oversaturated with information and short on time. They need to be able to quickly access the right learning tools and information.

According to learning analyst, Talented Learning, it is easier for LMS users to tolerate weaker user experience when training is mandatory, such as regulatory compliance training, but when the LMS is used for extended enterprise, such as dealership network training, the users must be persuaded to complete training regularly. In this case the user experience is key.

Key best practices for improved user experience

  • The User Interface (UI) has to be intuitive to reduce the number of clicks required to complete a task.
  • Applications have to be user-friendly and not built for experienced users only.
  • Make sure administrators, as well as selected users, can modify the layout of their homepage, edit menus and shortcuts and easily create new skins. This is a matter of configuration and not customization.
  • Social features such as forums are important for an LMS. It’s a place where managers and employees can share ideas and contribute to the development of best practices. Make sure you can easily embed Widgets (for example internal forums, Twitter feeds and YouTube videos) into your homepage so they are easily accessible for users.
  • Understand your vendor experience with learning portals and how well they integrate with the LMS.
  • Just-in-time learning is vital to the success of a learning program. Learning should be accessed on mobile device whenever users need it. That is why the ability to download content to a mobile device for playback even when offline is important.
  • Upgrade your LMS frequently – LMS vendors invest significant development resources into making sure that each successive version provides even better usability. This should also take into account user feedback, to give the best learning and performance management experience on any type of device.

 

Analytics capabilities

Measuring the business impact of learning using analytics tool is becoming increasingly important for the L&D function. 39.7% of organizations say poor analytics capabilities is a significant barrier to satisfaction with learning technology.

 

Key best practices for enhanced learning analytics

  • Focus on data that matters to your organization. Big data expert and author Bernard Marr points out in an article on Forbes: “Why go to all the time and trouble collecting data that you won’t or can’t use to deliver business insights? You must focus on things that matter the most otherwise you’ll drown in data… This is why it’s so important to start with the right questions.”
  • Start your journey with analytics now. It might take years to gather enough data before it will actually be relevant for the organization.
  • If you have already started your journey, make sure your analytics engine integrates multiple data sources. Your engine should correlate learning to other data coming from the rest of the business.
  • Most organizations don’t yet have a data analyst dedicated to learning. Make sure you have flexibility to create your own reports and easily create dashboards and charts without the need to learn complex tools.

 

Did you enjoy this blog? Then you might also be interested in our “8 Best Practices for a Successful LMS Implementation” brief. Download it now. If you’d like to speak to a NetDimensions LMS consultant about the challenges your organization is facing, get in touch here.
 

Measuring the business impact of learning

Measuring the business impact of learning was a key focus at the NetDimensions EMEA User conference in London in May. According to Fosway’s Learning and Talent Analytics: Practical Strategies to Drive Real Outcomes 2015 Study, 85% of companies say HR Analytics is a medium or high priority. In addition, recent research conducted by LEO found that more than 85% of L&D professionals want to use analytics to improve their learning programs, while over 77% believe that it’s possible to demonstrate learning’s impact. However, L&D departments are still unsure about how to effectively measure the business impact of their learning activities.

 

Why measuring the business of learning is important

As budgets inside large organizations are decreasing, it’s becoming increasingly important for L&D to demonstrate its impact to top management. We now have the capabilities and the tools to actually analyze the connection between Learning and Development activities, and business performance. According to the Brandon Hall Group’s Learning Analytics 2017 Study, as much as 51.5% of organizations only analyze their learning program’s data annually or on an ad hoc basis. Only 14.4% of organizations continuously analyze their learning program’s data. Organizations need to move away from a snapshot analysis, which quickly becomes outdated over time, to a more sustainable process where big data is used strategically to make business decisions.

The technology to measure the business impact of learning is now available in the market but organizations are struggling to put in place a sustainable strategy to measure and then demonstrate that impact.

In the interview below, Piers Lea, Chief Strategy Officer at NetDimensions’ partner company LEO and Donald H Taylor, Chairman of the Learning and Performance Institute, talk about why measuring the business Impact of learning is important and why L&D managers should begin the journey now.

 

Who needs to be on board in the organization for the strategy to be adopted?

The involvement from organizations’ top leadership in planning the L&D strategy is still pretty low, but it is growing quite fast. L&D should be leading the way and actively use big data to make business decisions. If L&D continues to lags behind, the business will take actions without involving the L&D function in strategic decisions. At the moment, there’s a huge opportunity for L&D to establish credibility and get a seat at the top management table. The trend clearly shows that L&D departments are becoming much more central to business strategy, but this won’t happen without L&D playing an active role in the process.

In the video below Piers Lea and Don H Taylor talk about the different stakeholders who should be involved in the organization for an effective L&D strategy to be adopted.

 

Is there any example of companies that are effectively measuring the impact of their learning activities?

MedStar is a US-based company in the Healthcare sector. They use learning analytics to evaluate the effectiveness of training on clinical metrics. In the video below, Piers Lea talks about this example.

 

What are the steps to start measuring the business impact of learning?

There is a step-by-step process to go through but every organization should start on that journey now.

The first step to measuring the business impact of learning is making sure your organization is collecting the right data. It might take years to gather enough data before it will actually be relevant for the organization. Look into that data to identify patterns and then progress up to advanced data evaluation. All this should be done before you can actually bring in correlating data from the business.

The L&D function is willing to take on that journey but there is a clear shortage of skills in terms of the ability to both organize and analyze data. According to Fosway’s Learning and Talent Analytics: Practical Strategies to Drive Real Outcomes 2015 Study, 90% of organizations see the lack of skilled resources as a challenge in progressing with HR Analytics. According to the Brandon Hall Group’s Learning Analytics 2017 Study, only 18% of organizations have a data analyst dedicated to learning.

In the video below, Piers Lea and Don H Taylor talk about the step-by-step process to start measuring the business impact of learning.

 

The importance of measuring the business impact of learning

The ability to deliver proven results is a huge focus for L&D at the moment, with a view to ensure that learning should be moving to the heart of the business strategy. Some experts think that the reason why large organizations will continue to exist is actually because of their ability to scale learning. Learning is becoming one of the key areas of competitive advantage, so measuring the business impact of learning is a vitally important subject, one which continues to grow in importance.

Did you enjoy this blog? Then you might also be interested in our “Maximizing the Business Impact of Learning” report from Fosway Group. Download it now. If you’d like to speak to a NetDimensions consultant about the importance of measuring business impact, get in touch here.

 

Demystifying Big Data and Analytics

For the past few years, buzzwords about (big or small) data and making sense of all that information have been thrown around quite often by industry research analysts and vendors alike.

 

First things first — what is big data? Where does it come from?

According to the Gartner IT Glossary big data includes high-volume, high-velocity and/or high-variety information assets that demand cost-effective, innovative forms of information processing that enable enhanced insight, decision making, and process automation.

The fourth V, veracity can be considered the most important. How accurate is that data in predicting business value? Do the results of a big data analysis actually make sense? Data must be able to be verified based on both accuracy and context.1

analytics-imageMore specifically in the context of HR professionals, department managers, chief learning officers, and training managers, the vast pool of information consists of personnel data, learning or training data, job profiles, competencies, performance appraisals, and more. Your organization already has some or all of these pieces of data, and even a lot more. One of the challenges is that these pieces of information are most likely stored or recorded in silos. 

Keep in mind there is already plenty of enough useful information to analyze within your Learning Management System (LMS) alone to get started.