LMS best practice: enhanced user experience and analytics capabilities

This post is the second in a 2-part blog series that looks at some of the ways that L&D managers can improve the learning technology in their organizations, with a specific focus on user experience and analytics. To read part 1, click here.

Learning Management Systems create poor user experience

According to a study conducted by the Brandon Hall Group, 50.6% of organizations say poor user experience is a significant barrier to satisfaction with learning technology. It’s important for a company to have an easy-to-use, modern-looking system.

Employees today are both oversaturated with information and short on time. They need to be able to quickly access the right learning tools and information.

According to learning analyst, Talented Learning, it is easier for LMS users to tolerate weaker user experience when training is mandatory, such as regulatory compliance training, but when the LMS is used for extended enterprise, such as dealership network training, the users must be persuaded to complete training regularly. In this case the user experience is key.

Maximising the business impact of learning

Trying to evaluate the impact that learning and development has on your people and ultimately, the business is not a new challenge. Learning should be a strategic investment that drives business performance and builds business capability. But knowing ‘how’ to achieve this measurement is not always easy.

There are different approaches to evaluation that I have explored with NetDimensions in our recent webinar and the accompanying paper. However, the time has come for us to move beyond just evaluating learning activity. At Fosway Group we often say that L&D has a habit of delivery. So to embrace impact as a central ethos, L&D needs to stop taking orders and just tracking completion rates, number of events run and happy sheets returned. Instead, we need to look at whether or not learning delivers a positive result – ideally for both the learner and the business. And if it doesn’t, we shouldn’t do it.

But 80% of the attendees at the webinar rated themselves as ‘OK’ or ‘Poor’ at measuring learning impact. And our current research into over 1000 learning professionals also shows there is considerable room for improvement with only 54% of respondents saying that their learning technology ‘always’ or ‘frequently’ delivers a positive impact for their organisation.

First things first, L&D needs to talk to the broader business audience.