Maximising the business impact of learning

Trying to evaluate the impact that learning and development has on your people and ultimately, the business is not a new challenge. Learning should be a strategic investment that drives business performance and builds business capability. But knowing ‘how’ to achieve this measurement is not always easy.

There are different approaches to evaluation that I have explored with NetDimensions in our recent webinar and the accompanying paper. However, the time has come for us to move beyond just evaluating learning activity. At Fosway Group we often say that L&D has a habit of delivery. So to embrace impact as a central ethos, L&D needs to stop taking orders and just tracking completion rates, number of events run and happy sheets returned. Instead, we need to look at whether or not learning delivers a positive result – ideally for both the learner and the business. And if it doesn’t, we shouldn’t do it.

But 80% of the attendees at the webinar rated themselves as ‘OK’ or ‘Poor’ at measuring learning impact. And our current research into over 1000 learning professionals also shows there is considerable room for improvement with only 54% of respondents saying that their learning technology ‘always’ or ‘frequently’ delivers a positive impact for their organisation.

First things first, L&D needs to talk to the broader business audience.

Building a Successful Workplace for the 2020s

This guest blog post by Jeremy Blain was originally published on LinkedIn Pulse as part of a week-long series of blog posts featuring the five drivers for success as we head to the 2020s workplace, according the white paper “5 Key Drivers to Build a Successful Workplace for the 2020s” published by Cegos Asia Pacific.

 
Driver #2 of 5: Impact of Technology
Welcome to the fourth industrial revolution — digitization of work, communication, collaboration, learning, life…
 

Considering an increasingly remote and potentially independent workforce of the near future, 83% of respondents believe that as Gen Z enter the workforce they will require and will demand far greater peer connectivity using mobile devices.

 
Technology remains at the heart of modern business, and is playing an increasingly important role in how we connect with clients and associates alike.

Respondents told us they are already preparing for the changes that come with new technology; many believing that our working practices will become more automated over time.
 

Technology Now

We asked a group of business, learning and HR leaders how their organizations were using / benefiting from new technologies, enabling greater efficiency of and effectiveness within their workforce.

Their top 5 outputs were: