LMS: Evolution or Extinction – 8 trends that change everything (Part 3 of 8): Compliance

Trend #3: Compliance
(Part 3 of 8)

Don’t Be Caught Unawares

Multinational and global companies deal with different regulations and various regulators around the world. Training records are nearly always reviewed during an inspection or audit by regulatory authorities to check that employees have received the appropriate training and their competencies or certifications are current and valid.

SOPs & Training Records

In environments where personnel are required to work according to written procedures, documented instructions or standard operating procedures (SOPs), there needs to be a set of guidelines that define the tasks to be done and what has to be documented to demonstrate that the activity was actually performed. If any deviations to the procedure are made, they have to be documented at the time of the deviation, not later.

Training plays an important part when implementing a new or updated SOP since the training is what teaches employees on the new procedures. This is where the learning management system (LMS) plays a vital role — being able to schedule and track the training of individuals on the SOP’s. It is critical that organizations are able to keep accurate records of individuals and their training plans.

Electronic versus Paper

There is no regulatory requirement that dictates whether organizations must use paper or electronic media to document their personnel training records; it is left to individual companies to make that decision. The major differences between the two media are:

Item Electronic Paper
Training Plan Generated in LMS, stored easily and accessible to all appropriate personnel Manually written and requires physical presence of the person to read the document
Training Class Individual signs on to a training class and is recorded in the LMS database Presence is recorded manually on an attendance sheet
Training Completion Completion is automatically recorded in the LMS database Course completion certifications have to be gathered and recorded manually
Real-time Data Always current Not always up-to-date as records are manually updated at a later point after the training is completed
Training Records Can easily view records online or printed as a report Reports have to be manually generated from certificates that have been gathered, which may be incomplete
Data Integrity Before each important operation in the LMS, an electronic signature (e-signature) is required before the operation can happen Manually signed or initialed documents are not easy to verify or prove as valid
Version Control Electronic training records are accurately updated with the  exact version of courses taken; course revisions can automatically trigger required training to maintain compliance Paper-based document control is prone to mistakes; paper records are difficult to control, may be lost/misplaced or changed without anyone knowing and version control is hard
Audits Changes made to sensitive data are audited in the database with info on the type of change, who made it and when. Changes include any creation, update or deletion of sensitive data. Physical checklists, manually recorded

Compliance-LMS3of7
LMS Compliance Considerations

  • e-signatures in audit tracking
  • competencies and certifications
  • proactive reporting, dashboards, and analytics
  • easy access to compliance content

Given the above, are compliance checklists and reactive reporting enough from a risk perspective versus true workforce readiness and proactive compliance dashboards?

This is the third of an eight-part series on LMS: Evolution or Extinction — 8 Trends that Change Everything.

Gamification: Putting Play into Learning & Development

Just about every adult has a memory of childhood competition. From the playground to the sports field to the arcade, we enjoyed besting our friends or boasting about our accomplishments.

Now as adults, we are faced with the challenges of our careers, trying to keep pace with an ever changing informational world and completing required training to meet those challenges. We attend seminars, watch webinars, sit in classes, or use online learning portals to take courses. But who says this has to be boring? Why not make the learning process fun?

Introducing gamification to the corporate learning process… just what our inner child needs.

For the uninitiated, gamification is the application of game-design elements to non-game contexts. You’ve probably already seen this all around you. After all, gamification elements work their way into our lives every day, ranging from achieving new levels on your Fitbit to earning Starbucks Stars for free drinks. The goal is to add elements of fun and reward by recognizing achievements and driving engagement and participation.

And that’s where gamification has the potential to make a significant impact on online training – because if we make it fun and offer elements that make learning more interesting, we encourage learners to be more engaged with the course content. And more importantly, the outcome that we can achieve is to meet our organizations’ strategic goals of having a well-trained workforce that meets our compliance requirements.

So, what are some ways that gamification can support your goals? Let’s take a look at a few learning and developing goals and some examples to demonstrate how we can apply gamification elements to them to improve learner engagement:

Goal: Motivate learners to be engaged and complete a curriculum
Gamification Opportunity: Provide rewards, badges or other incentives for completing the curriculum within a specific timeframe.

Goal: Measuring a learner’s understanding of a specific procedure
Gamification Opportunity: Create a mapping activity around the procedure and award points towards completing correctly in a certain timeframe.

Goal: Make content more engaging
Gamification Opportunity: Create gaming elements such as levels or challenges to encourage learners to move through the content to completion.

Goal: Encourage certification and skill qualification
Gamification Opportunity: Tie certifications to rewards, post individual and group results, make the process competitive with leaderboards and visible comparisons.

Goal: Encourage timely course completion
Gamification Opportunity: Award points for completing the course within certain timeline and points for correctly answering timed questions inside the course.

The key is to rethink both the structure and content of your learning and build these elements into your online learning and training programs. Gamification does not have to mean a full overhaul of a course, rather adding gaming elements to existing content to achieve higher levels of engagement. As these examples demonstrate, it can be as simple as adding a time element to a quiz or knowledge check!

And while we may no longer be running around our childhood playgrounds, we will be creating a fun environment that engages learners and helps them achieve their goals.

For more about Gamification and its potential for learning and development, download our white paper “Gamification – Does it have a place in your L&D Content Development.”

Big Data, EBT adoption, eBooks, and the need for new talent get airplay at APATS and EATS 2015 (Part 2)

In this two-part blog post, we share the insights and experiences of Steve Young and Rory Stewart at the recent airline training symposiums hosted by Halldale in Asia Pacific and Europe. The 12th Asia Pacific Airline Training Symposium (APATS) was held in Thailand in September with representatives from more than 50 airlines were in attendance. Meanwhile, the 14th European Airline Training Symposium (EATS) was hosted for the first time in Poland where delegates from more than 70 airlines and 40 countries attended last month.

 

EATS 2015 Conference Review by Rory Stewart

Some really good initiatives worth noting were the number of vendors using Apple iBooks to bring content to tablets. Both Boeing and Airbus are now talking about reducing content size by creating eBooks for Operators (Emirates Airlines being one example).

Big Data, EBT adoption, eBooks, and the need for new talent get airplay at APATS and EATS 2015 (Part 1)

In this two-part blog post, we share the insights and experiences of Steve Young and Rory Stewart at the recent airline training symposiums hosted by Halldale in Asia Pacific and Europe. The 12th Asia Pacific Airline Training Symposium (APATS) was held in Thailand in September with representatives from more than 50 airlines were in attendance. Meanwhile, the 14th European Airline Training Symposium (EATS) was hosted for the first time in Poland where delegates from more than 70 airlines and 40 countries attended last month.

 

APATS 2015 Conference Review by Steve Young

Attending the sessions on Day 1 of the recent APATS Conference here in Bangkok, I learned a few things about some threads that were common in many of the conference sessions. Although there were no samples shown, big data and analytics received its fair share of comments throughout the day.

Learning “On the Move” – Key Strategies for a Mobile Learning Program

The mobile devices in our pockets have officially taken over. As of October 2014, there are now more mobile devices than people. Mobile devices have now become the primary internet device for many web users. In fact, the 2015 Internet Trends Report found U.S. web users turn to their mobile device for almost 3 hours of internet time each day.

As usage becomes ubiquitous, we expect these devices to never be out of reach. They have also become an effective learning tool. Hence, the rise of learning now being pushed to the mobile experience.

Just like we learned that taking a classroom experience and putting it online does not make an effective web based training or online learning experience – neither will simply scaling down existing content so it fits on a smaller screen.

Learning Solutions Magazine said it best:

“Being able to view eLearning content on a smartphone doesn’t make it mLearning in just the same way that throwing slides meant for use in instructor-led training onto a web page doesn’t make them eLearning. Redesign is always the best option.”

An effective, strategic mobile learning or performance support program requires new thinking and new approaches. Here are three strategies we have learned building mobile programs for NetDimensions’ clients.