Overcoming Barriers to Mobile Learning Deployment

 

How can you overcome the challenges of deploying mobile learning in your organization?

The first generation iPhone, arguably the first smartphone, was released in June 2007. In the decade since then, the number of users continues to grow at an astounding rate.

Its ubiquity has allowed smartphones to become an effective learning tool especially in business environments, where learners are either located in remote areas with limited internet connectivity, work in manufacturing facilities with no access to desktop computers, or work in the field and are always mobile.

Mobile learning has been a hot topic for learning & development departments for years, however deployments of effective mobile learning strategies have been slow.

Building Global Virtual Teams and Virtual Learning Capability

A new model of global organization is coming to the fore. Traditional top-down hierarchies have been swept away in favor of agile and responsive ‘networks of teams’. These are virtual teams that are set up and disbanded as needed to create new products and services and meet fresh global challenges from new competitors.

The challenge organizations face is how best to build the skills base of individuals to optimize global virtual team working.

Deloitte has described this trend as ‘the rise of teams’. Many companies have already begun the move away from conventional functional structures – 92% of companies surveyed by Deloitte believe that redesigning the organization is ‘very important’ or ‘important’. Deloitte discovered that only 38% of all companies and 24% of large companies with more than 50,000 employees are organized function by function.

However, key to the success of contemporary, agile ways of working is ensuring that individual employees have the necessary skills for flexible working across borders.

Finding the value of learning for your business today

What is the value of learning?

For workplace Learning and Development (L&D) professionals the answer may take many forms. It may be an individual’s positive reaction to learning something new. It may be the ability of individuals – or their employers – to tackle a new task. In more formal measurement, it may be seen in the calculation of a learning programme’s Return on Investment (ROI). Whatever approach the department takes, however, any assessment of the impact of learning is effectively meaningless without answering one question.

How does the business see the value of learning?

Focus on Integration: Connecting Learning to the Right Systems

As the human capital technology landscape expands and solutions become more specialized, integration has become more critical than ever. Not only do we need to think about how each of these talent-focused platforms work together, but how they work together with other systems within and outside of the organization.

According to Brandon Hall Group’s 2016 Learning Technologies survey, integration capabilities are one of the top-three most important criteria organizations have for their learning technology providers, with 46% saying it is essential and 30% saying it is critical these services are available.

In an environment where fewer than half (44%) of companies are looking to get a suite of integrated talent management modules, it is important organizations understand the ins and outs of integration.

21 CFR Part 11 Electronic Records and Signatures Regulation – 20 Years On

This year is the 20th anniversary of the publication of Title 21 Code of Federal Regulations Part 11 (21 CFR Part 11 or just Part 11), the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation about control of electronic records and electronic signatures for computerised systems used by pharmaceutical and medical device companies. This is a relatively small regulation (less than 2 complete pages of the Federal Register) that has had and continues to have a big impact on regulated organisations and software suppliers.

When implementing computerised systems, the requirements of Part 11 need to be fully understood. To help this, I want to explore the following areas in this blog post:

  • What is Part 11?
  • Interpretation of Part 11 by the applicable predicate rule
  • Understanding the technical, procedural and administrative controls of the regulation
  • What is software validation?
  • Why do I need to validate my LMS?