Gamification Ideas for Learning & Development Programs

In our previous post, we discussed the concept of gamification and how it puts both play and healthy competition back into learning and staff development. Now that you understand how gamification can support your learning program’s strategic goals, how do you get started?

Let’s start with the understanding that there are two general types of gamification activities in learning development:

  • Structural Gamification – assigning points, badges or rewards to structure a competition among an organization’s employees, business units or extended enterprise. Points or rewards could be achieved various elements of a curriculum or a course such as achieving passing scores on a required certification within a specified timeframe. Generally, these scores would be posted on a leaderboard or something similar, often within your learning management system or a dedicated learning portal.
  • Content Gamification – when gamification elements are wholly integrated into the content and the context is more game-like.  The entire course does not have to be game-like, rather just certain activities that add a level of completion.

Again, the intent is not create a game in and of itself, but to offer elements that make the learning more interesting and reward learners so they are more connected to the content.

A good place to start when considering gamification is to consider adding a structural framework to measure learner achievement and display it for others to view. 

Here are some ideas to consider:

  • Points for completion of courses. If learners have profiles in your learning management system, make these points or cumulative score as part of the profile so they have an instant reminder of their progress.
  • Badges earned by learners as they pass assessments or achieve point levels. For example, for a basic assessment they could earn the “Newbie” badge and as they progress they earn other badges either tied to skill level (e.g. “Expert”) or to terms relative to the content (e.g. “Master Crafter” for construction focused content).  As users accumulate points from above and cross certain thresholds, give them a badge (e.g. 500 points = “Just Getting Started” and 1,000 points = “Getting Things Done”).
  • Leaderboards make the results visible and introduce a competitive nature to the learning experience. We suggest sharing everyone’s progress and featuring the current leaders in terms of points and badge accumulation.

Once you move past structural gamification, we get to Content Gamification where the level of effort increases – but so does the potential to create a dynamic learning experience.  Effective content Gamification for adult learners should always include three elements: 1) a timed experience, 2) the ability to accede to new levels, and 3) the assignment of points or other rewards for each step of a gaming experience.

Some examples of content gamification include:

  • Timed quizzes/knowledge checks: achieve more points for accuracy on the first try, more points for completing within certain established time ranges; adding audible or visual reinforcements such as bells for correct answers can make this experience more fun as well.
  • Simulations – create online versions of real world situations where trainees need to solve problems. Just like pilots that train in a safe environment, this gives your teams an opportunity to try different problem solving techniques and be rewarded for their success.
  • Immersive Experiences – providing a rich interactive experience brings learners deeper into content and lets them focus on the learning objectives. Potential opportunities in an immersive experience include:
    • Scenario-driven situations with branching
    • Story based experiences
    • Quests and challenges

The objective here is to create an immersive experience that wraps gamification around the learning content. And in these types of experiences, you can still add activities such as point accumulations, rewards, badges, levels, and other recognition that add a competitive framework to the learning process.

When you are done implementing any of these methods, you will have created a learning experience that creates active learners who willingly participate in an enjoyable learning program – while satisfying your strategic training and learning objectives.

For more about Gamification and its potential for learning and development, download our white paper “Gamification – Does it have a place in your L&D Content Development.”

2 Comments

  1. In our discussions with clients, we have found that requirements for things like leader boards and other structural gaming elements are very specific to the organization and requires a level of customization. Our guidance is to build this functionality into a portal that sits in front of Talent Suite and which is fully integrated. With the robust suite of APIs available, it is possible to build out all of a client’s requested functionality and pass data back and forth between the portal and Talent Suite. Things like catalogs, user data and more can easily be displayed on the portal and point accumulations, awards, etc. can be passed back to user profiles in Talent Suite. We have built portals like this for several customers in the past year.

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