LMS: Evolution or Extinction: 8 Trends That Change Everything (Part 2 of 8): Extended Enterprise LMS

Trend #2: Extended Enterprise LMS

While most companies (71%) still use their learning management system (LMS) mainly for employee training (see chart below), the globalization and increased competition have led to the rise in the number of partner relationships, distributor and reseller networks, franchises, and contractors, and consequently the need for a centralized learning solution for the whole extended enterprise.

LMS-user-community-chart-BHG

Centralized training and certification management allows companies to keep product and service quality consistent across the whole value chain.

At the same time the increasingly strict and continually changing regulatory environment has created a need for compliance management across the whole value chain, especially in highly regulated industries.

The delivery of training, licensing, and certification programs to external channels increases partner, customer, and end-user engagement, satisfaction and product usage. It is the most cost-efficient way to bring external stakeholders to the same level of competency and product knowledge as the internal employees.

By creating customized and branded learning portals, companies can provide engaging learning experiences for different audiences across the extended enterprise. Mobile solutions also allow the contractors, such as sales agents, to take training in a flexible way, at the point of need, even when not connected to the Internet.

High-quality training, certification management, and the ability to measure KPIs across the whole value chain can have a direct impact on an organization’s business performance. Learning in the extended enterprise should also be an interactive process. For example, the dealership network is able to give valuable insights from buyers and market when the LMS supports such collaboration.

To measure performance against defined KPIs using advanced analytics tools, reports can be segmented by learner group, whether they consist of internal employees, partners, suppliers, or dealers.

When thinking about using an LMS for the extended enterprise, security management needs to be taken into account. A compliance-focused LMS can support central management of security with features such as access and password control, version control, workflow management, e-signatures, as well as audit trails of all activities.

What to consider for your LMS in terms of the extended enterprise:

  • Portals, branding, and personalization
  • E-commerce capabilities
  • Security
  • A new role of the LMS
    • Revenue generation
    • Quality management
    • Documentation distribution
    • Partner certifications
    • Analytics

Given these considerations, can you leverage the same LMS investment for both internal & external audiences?

This is the second of an eight-part series on LMS: Evolution or Extinction — 8 Trends that Change Everything.

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