Improving Performance Locally in a Global Market

stacey-harrisGuest post by Stacey Harris, VP of Research and Advisory Services at Brandon Hall Group. Stacey Harris oversees Brandon Hall Group’s research strategy and agenda, solution provider relations, and advisory services.

More than 83% of organizations with a skilled labor workforce state that it’s difficult to find employees capable of addressing their organizations’ hiring needs. By 2020, global workforce shortages are predicted for critical skilled roles in healthcare, high-tech, and manufacturing.

Yet unemployment in 2012 increased by more than 4.2 million people, according to the International Labour Organization (ILO), jumping to 197 million people globally. “Many of the new jobs require skills that jobseekers do not have,” said ILO Director-General Guy Ryder. That is especially true for 74 million next-generation workers between the ages of 15- to 24-years-old who are currently unemployed.

Businesses and governments alike are quickly realizing that long-term strategies for performance improvement, growth, innovation, and market share must include a workforce strategy focused on developing critical skills inside their organizations.

On  Oct. 23, at NetDimensions Next Steps 2013 in London, I’m looking forward to addressing these topics and sharing global data from Brandon Hall Group on:

  • Managing global talent scarcity
  • Embracing our changing world: getting on board
  • Creating strategic connections between performance and learning
  • Developing a learning environment to build the workforce of tomorrow

The Skills Gap concerns may very well be global issues – with real business impact:

  • More than 55% of manufacturing organizations say a lack of skilled labor impacts their ability to grow the business.
  • More than 35% of high-tech organizations say a lack of skilled labor impacts their ability manage costs and grow the business.
  • 33% of healthcare organizations say that a lack of skilled labor impacts their ability to comply with external quality standards and regulations.

But the answer to these challenges is more likely a local answer. Those organizations that ranked themselves as first-rate in managing community and educational relationships were 50% more likely to have all of their Key Performance Indicators moving in a positive direction.

Organizations that hired employees expecting to provide continuous development were correlated with the highest levels of ongoing business performance compared to those that hired people with the expectation of providing just onboarding development.

We’ll be holding several discussions throughout the day Oct. 23 about the role of learning, talent, and HR leaders in preparing their organizations to compete in a new world where performance and talent are tightly connected.

Next Steps London
Keynote: Improving Performance Locally in a Global Market

Stacey Harris will share hot-off-the-press global research on how organizations are addressing talent scarcity issues while developing the next generation workforce. 

Click here for more information on Next Steps 2013.

Mobile Learning – The 6 C’s of Innovation

It’s been almost a year since we made available our new on-demand mobile learning native application for iPad and Android tablets on the AppStore and Google Play. It’s called NetDimensions Talent Slate and I think it provides a fresh an innovative approach to how our clients are approaching mobile learning. Of course, the market will tell us at the end if we have been right or not.

screen-slate

What I can say though is that for some time now we have been thinking very hard about what mobile means to learning, employee enablement, and talent development. And allow me to concentrate on tablets here. Because with the advent of the iPad, never before have we experienced a single device on which we can check email, browse the internet, deliver a presentation, do our expense report, read a book, listen to music, watch a movie, play a game, place a video call, and share with our kids. All on the same device.

So, although some describe mobile learning as yet another “channel” or another “modality” of learning, I disagree. I think mobile learning is a paradigm shift, similar to what e-learning was for classroom training. And tablets are the forefront of this paradigm shift.

Nevertheless, most of the early efforts we have been witnessing in mobile learning were all about trying to get e-learning to work on mobile devices. Hence the prevailing question: “how can I get my flash courses to run on the iPad?” I argue that this is not even the right question to ask now, is it? If mobile learning is a paradigm shift, it requires a new wave of innovation for designing, delivering, and tracking learning.

Some of the things we have been working on (and we are still working on) when it comes to our approach on innovating on tablets are:

  1. Cruising – navigating on a tablet is not the same as navigating on a PC or a laptop. NetDimensions Talent Slate features an intuitive navigation concept based on federated search.
  2. Context – context in learning has always been important, but never so much as in mobile learning. My job role and task at hand, my geo location, who (and what) is around me, what I have been doing, the type of device I am using, all provide context that can be extremely relevant to my learning experience.
  3. Connectivity – can it be taken for granted? Is connectivity really ubiquitous globally? We have made NetDimensions Talent Slate operate both online and offline with smart synchronization logic when internet connectivity is available.
  4. Collaboration – a mobile device is used to communicate, so there is the expectation that the application will allow me to locate and connect to other users, share own-generated content, and contribute to the overall knowledge base.
  5. Co-operation – the ability to easily integrate and play well with other systems in the mobile ecosystem is now an even more obvious requirement. Interfaces like the TinCan API will help systems & content speak to each other so that organizations can collect all the learning experiences of their users from across multiple systems into one place.
  6. Content – This will require a different instructional design approach, more tailored to the mobile user and taking better advantage of the unique affordances a mobile device like a tablet offers to users. If we can’t get interactivity or personalized content nuggets on a tablet, where else will we get it?

We have a long way to go still, but now is the time of innovation in the industry, innovation both from technology and content providers and from organizations deploying mobile learning solutions.

And in closing, here’s a product briefing report from the Brandon Hall Group  about NetDimensions Talent Slate.